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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
Battalion of State Cadets      
Company Unknown
Robert B. Arnold - Lt. Colonel   
Never wounded. Was in First Manassas through Appomattox. Died abt 1927, SC.
Contact Name:  Mark Anderson
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/18/2007
Company Unknown
John Taylor Stenhouse - 1st Lieutenant   
John Taylor Stenhouse was wounded on July 21, 1861 at at Manassas Plains, Va (1st Bull Run or Manassas?) and died Aug. 27. A lieutenant in Co. E, Bowman Guards, Infantry of Hampton's Legion. He is not to be confused with Pvt. John Taylor Stenhouse, his cousin, who was in Co. B. 16th SC Infantry and survived the war.
Contact Name:  David Edelen
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  12/23/2013
Company A
Charles Pitts - Private   
Pitts, Charles first joined the Hampton Legion Co. A. at Columbia, SC. He later furloughed to 1st SC Orr’s Rifles and was listed at serving in both Company B & D. He was 38 years old when he enlisted
He transferred as a Private on April 6,1863 to the 1st SC Orr’s Rifles Co B. at Blackwater, for the duration of the war.
He then transferred to 1st SC Orr’s Rifles Co D. and was captured at Appomattox, VA on April 3, 1865. He was sent to City Point and then to Hart's Island, NY Harbor. Charles was released from the POW camp on June16, 1865 when he signed the Oath of Allegiance to the United State. He had dark complexion, dark hair, gray eyes, 5'6 1/2' tall.
Charles was the son of Joel Pitts of Pickens Co.,SC
Contact Name:  Shirley (Pitts) Bennett
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  NONE
Date Added:  3/28/2007
Company A
Jehu G Postell - Private   
Artifact found for Jehu G. Postell in Georgia, finder wishes to return to family. 'Jehu G. Postell Co. A Hampton Leg'n SC Vol.
C.S.A. War 1861-5'

J.G. Postell (First_Last)
Regiment Name Infantry Regiment, Hampton Legion South Carolina.
Side Confederate
Company A
Soldier's Rank_In Private
Soldier's Rank_Out Private
Alternate Name
Notes
Film Number M381 roll 26

--------
Update: Oct 2011, The artifact (badge) was returned to a family descendant.
Contact Name:  Barry George
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/10/2007
Company A
George Washington Speer - Private   
Originally in 7 S.C.; transferred to Company A of Legion Mounted Infantry in exchange for a unable to mount Nov 64; paroled mounted at Appomattox; resident near Lowndesville; maternal great grand uncle of submitter
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company B
Abner Griffin League Collier - Private   
Enlisted Sep 1863 while Legion en route to Tennessee; courier in 1865; paroled mounted at Appomattox; b. 1847; d. 1903; farmer and Baptist minister postwar
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company B
Daniel Pressly Sturkey - 3rd Sergeant   
Original PVT in company 14 Jun 61; promoted SGT 1862; WIA Seven Pines 31 May 62, and Sharpsburg 17 Sep 62; KIA Dandridge, Tenn. 17 Jan 64; never married; b. ca. 1840; d. 1864; buried in Family Cemetery after war
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company B
Marion Benjamin Sturkey - Private   
Enl Aug 61; seriously WIA (shell fragment, hip) Samaria Church 24 Jun 64; born 1837; died 1920; resident Plum Branch, S.C.
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company B
Thomas Jefferson Sturkey - Private   
Enl 1863; POW Appomattox Station 8 Apr 65; paroled Farmville ca. 12 Apr 65; moved to Georgia postwar and lived Columbia County; b. ca 1847; d. 1907
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company B
William Oscar Sturkey - Private   
Enl Aug 1861; POW near Samaria Church 23 Jun 64; paroled Elmira Jul 65; b. 1842; d. 1921; resident McCormick, S.C. postwar; Mayor of McCormick
Contact Name:  O. Lee Sturkey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/12/2006
Company C
Cobb DeBruhl - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Chris DeBruhl
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  4/1/2014
Company C
robert t reynolds - Private   
got kicked out of the Ga militia because he was too young and rad off to South Carolina. His father Eldridge J Reynolds faught for the 38th ga infantry and was kia 3 May 1863 either spotsylvania or chanselorsville. from what i can find out he was wounded in the battle of atlanta
Contact Name:  albert Lee Reynolds
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  1/8/2010
Company C
John Pringle Strange - Private   
B. 1843 D. 1909 Clarendon Co. Enlisted co. C. Hampton Legion wounded by overhead shell burst, fragment in back, near spine. At 1st. Manassas. Hospital in Warrenton Va. till Oct. when discharged. Never returned to service. Remained in poor health for the rest of his life due to wounding. Worked in sheriff office 14 years, Clarendon Co. Buried in Manning Cemetery. Brother of Joseph of this command and Robert, James and William of 7th SC Cav. Co.I
Contact Name:  Kenneth Williams
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/16/2009
Company C
Joseph Davy Strange - Private   
B. 1839 Enlisted in Co. C Hampton Legion . Brother of John Pringle Strange of this Co. Survived 1st. Manassas but died of camp Measles at Bacon Race Church Va. Sept. 28,1861. Unable to find soldier graves in this area. Would like to know if anyone knows where he is buried ?
Contact Name:  Kenneth Williams
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  11/16/2009
Company D
Andrew Jackson Stringer - 1st Lieutenant   
Would love to have any infromation on COmpany D that anyone might have. Thanks, Stan
Contact Name:  Stan Converse
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/4/2011
Company D
John Robert Taylor - Private   
Listed as dead following the war. He wasn't dead and returned to his wife after she'd remarried.
Contact Name:  Elisa Black-Taylor
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/29/2016
Company E
Robert Bolling Allison - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Allison George
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  5/10/2019
Company Field & Staff
James Emory Bagwell - Sergeant   
After the battle of Antietam, the devastated 4th Battalion reorganized and on November 6th, 1862 two of it’s remaining companies was joined by Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Pickett’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps commanded by now by Lt. Col. Martin Gary.

He was involved in the battle at Fredericksburg on December 13th, 1862 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Pickett’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps. He served under Lt. Col. Martin Gary and was situated at Marye’s Heights against the main body of the Union forces. The line of battle that day had Jenkin’s Brigade at the Marye’s Heights at the sunken road, and wall skirting the road. The wall was about shoulder height, and gave excellent cover for musketry. Jim saw eleven different frontal assaults and charges made against Marye’s Heights, the stone wall and sunken road with not a man coming within thirty yards. Union casualties in from of the sunken road were over nine thousand with few Confederate losses. Jim had once again distinguished himself fighting in the heat of the battle holding off the Federal onslaught.

He missed action at the battle of Chancellorsville during May 1st through 4th, 1863. He was deployed at Suffox, Virginia as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of French’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps. He served under Lt. Col. Martin Gary. Siege was laid by the Union Army to Suffox, and was defended by Uncle Jim’s Regiment from April 12th to May 4th, 1863. The siege was raised and Suffox did not fall. The Confederate casualties from Jim’s Regiment were 400 killed and wounded, 500 captured during the siege.

He missed action at the battle of Gettysburg during July 1st through 3rd, 1863. At the request of President Jefferson Davis, The Hampton Legion Infantry did not participate in the battles at Gettysburg; they were left to guard Richmond in case it was attacked while the main body of the army was away. Thus, he was deployed at Richmond, Virginia guarding the Capital as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Pickett’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps which the remainder of was nearly destroyed in Pickett’s Charge on the 3rd day of battle. He served still under Col. Martin Gary. Thus, he thwarted certain death from being part of Pickett’s charge by luckily being in the sole Regiment in Pickett’s Division not being deployed at Gettysburg.

He moved with two divisions of Longstreet’s Corps to reinforce General Bragg in North Georgia two months after Gettysburg. He was involved in the battle at Chickamauga, the South’s greatest victory, on September 19th and 20th, 1863 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps. He served under Lt. Col. H. Dingle and was situated on the second morning at the far left flank of Longstreet’s Corp after arriving at night after the first day’s battle. The line of battle that day had Anderson’s Division facing the Rossville Road on the Confederate left flank against the right flank and McCook’s Corp of the Union forces. A gap was created by movement of troops in the Union line on the right of the Union line. Ready to exploit this, General Longstreet with three divisions, including Uncle Jim, sent his entire wing in force, some 23,000 men, four brigades deep, across a half-mile front, in the largest charge of the Civil War, storming into the gap annihilating the Union right, and reserves. The charge of “unsurpassed grandeur” and irresistible onslaught had over half the Union Army in full disorderly retreat, only General Thomas remained, the original left of the Union. In the afternoon after the trouncing of the Union right and Center, Longstreet wheeled his troops in a right hand hook northward attacking General Thomas in an attempt to get behind the Federal line. General Thomas held. Assault after assault by Longstreet’s men and Uncle Jim failed to destroy Thomas who retreated the night of the battle.

He was involved in the battle at Wauhatchie on October 28th and 29th, 1863 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps. He served under Lt. Col. H. Dingle and was situated at Wauhatchie, Tennessee participating in the siege of Chattanooga, Tennessee against the Army of the Cumberland of General Thomas of the Union forces commanded by General U.S. Grant. The line of battle that day had Jenkin’s Brigade at Wauhatchie, a vital point on the railway in the valley below Lookout Mountain’s northwest side. The Union Army sent Thomas with the Eleventh Corps, and the Second Division of the Twelfth Corps commanded by General William B. Hazen, in pontoon boats across the Tennessee River against Wauhatchie and it’s defenders surprising them. The resulting battle ended in defeat for the Confederates who retreated from Wauhatchie opening a supply route for the starving Union Army in Chattanooga effectively lifting the siege of Chattanooga, This enabled the Union Army to maintain enough supplies to allow for offensive action by the Union forces there against the remaining Confederate siege. . The Confederate casualties were 300 killed, and 1200 wounded during the battle.

Uncle Jim moved with two divisions of Longstreet’s Corps to take Knoxville, Tennessee leaving Bragg’s army at Chattanooga. The siege began on November 7th, 1863 and was abandoned on December 4th, 1863. Jim was involved in the battle at Knoxville on November 12th, 1863 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Jenkin’s Brigade, part of Anderson’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps. He served under Lt. Col. H. Dingle and was situated at against the of the Union forces defenses of the Army of Ohio, and General Burnside. The line of battle that day had Jenkin’s Brigade as part of an assault on the Union breastworks which was unsuccessful. The Confederate casualties for the siege were 80 killed, 400 wounded, and 300 captured.

Uncle Jim, from a division of Longstreet’s Corps, returned to Virginia from Knoxville then leaving for South Carolina in December 1863 to be mounted returning to Lee’s Army in June 1864 as cavalry under Hampton, and Fitz Lee.

He was involved in the siege of Petersburg from returning in June 1864 after being mounted in South Carolina to it’s fall in April 1865 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Gary’s Brigade, part of the Department of Richmond under General Richard Ewell. He served under Col. Thomas Logan.

He was involved in the siege of Petersburg and the battle of the Third Winchester on September 20th, 1864 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Gary’s Brigade, part of the Department of Richmond under General Richard Ewell against the Sixth, Eighth, and 1st and 2nd Divisions of the Nineteenth Corps under the company of Maj. Gen. Phil Sheridan of the Union Army. Uncle “Jim” would have witnessed the routing of the Confederates in Sheridan’s Calvary charge that overwhelmed Confederate infantry leading to nearly 4000 captured by the Union Army. Being Calvary himself led to Uncle “Jim’s” escape. He served under Col. Thomas Logan.

He was involved in the siege of Petersburg and the battle of New Market Height’s on September 29th, 1864 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Gary’s Brigade, part of the Department of Richmond under General Richard Ewell. He served under Col. Thomas Logan.

He was involved in the siege of Petersburg and the battle of Roper’s Farm on September 30th, 1864 as part of Hampton’s Legion in Gary’s Brigade, part of the Department of Richmond under General Richard Ewell. He served under Col. Thomas Logan.

He was involved in the battle of Salyor’s Creek during the retreat of the Confederate Army from Petersburg and Richmond on April 6th, 1865 as part of Fitz Lee’s Calvary in Gary’s Brigade, part of the Department of Richmond under General Richard Ewell. He served under Lt. Col. R.B. Arnold. The Federal onslaught caught up to Lee’s Army attempting to resupply catching the re-guard, and wagon trains destroying them. Uncle “Jim” would’ve been lucky to escape this battle uncaptured, and did. General Ewell was captured at this battle as well as a fourth of the Confederate Army.
He was involved in the last charge of the Confederates on April 9th, 1865 at Farmville, Virginia, and subsequent surrender on that same day as part of Fitz Lee’s Calvary in Gary’s Brigade serving under Lt. Col. R.B. Arnold. The Confederates surrendered 28,000 men at Appomattox less than 2000 of which were Calvary.
Contact Name:  Ben Bagwell
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/28/2012
Company G
James Mitchum - Private   
James Mitchum joined Hampton's Legion in 1864 when it became mounted infantry. He was 19 years old, a farmer, illiterate and spent the first few months in the hospital. He surrendered at Appomateaux.
Contact Name:  James Mitchum
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/19/2010
Company G
Samuel Mitchum - Private   
Samuel Mitchum joined Hamptons Legion, Co. G in 1864 with his brothers. The roles show he was sent to the hospital with measels but disappeared from the roles afterward.
Contact Name:  James Mitchum
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/19/2010
Company G
Thomas Mitchum - Private   
Thomas Mitchum joined Hampton's Legion Co. C in 1864. He was in hospital with measels but never showed up on the roles afterward.
Contact Name:  James Mitchum
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/19/2010
Company H
Allen Manley Snider - 2nd Lieutenant   
Allen Manley Snider (1842 - 1921)enlisted at Camp Hampton near Columbia, SC on October 26, 1861. He was assigned to Company H, Infantry Regiment, Hampton Legion of South Carolina as a private. This company subsequently became Co. H. Mounted Infantry Regiment, Hampton Legion South Carolina Volunteers. Sergeant Snider rose to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant on 8th December, 1864. He was wounded at the battle of Newmarket Heights Va. in 1864 He was paroled at Appomattox Court House VA on April 10, 1865.
Contact Name:  Dewey Snyder
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  9/19/2012
Company H
Stephen Sylvester Walters - Private   
My family has traced our ancestry as far back as the Civil War, but we are now stymied. Although our great-grandfather was born in SC, we can't find his father's first name and don't know when the family first came to SC and from where.
Contact Name:  Anne W. Scott
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/25/2014
Company I
James Addison Alewine - Private   
1861-1865, Confederate Army Service Records, National Archives, Washington, DC:
James A. Alewine (1843-1911), my great-great-grandfather, joined the Confederate Army for a one-year enlistment at the Anderson Court House on April 14, 1861, just two days after the start of the Civil War, when General Beauregard, in command of Confederate forces at Charleston, opened fire on Fort Sumter. The Union commander surrendered the following day.
James was assigned to Company J, 4th Regiment South Carolina Volunteers and after four weeks of instruction near Columbia, SC boarded a train on June 17, 1861 with his unit and traveled to Richmond arriving three days later. Then they railed to Leesburg about 25 miles west of Washington, DC and encamped at 'Camp Carolina' on 23 June.
By July 17 they marched to positions near Manassas, Virginia and were engaged by Union forces at the Battle of First Manassas. His company was positioned on the west bank of Bull Run, overlooking the Stone Bridge, a key crossing. The fight ended in a rout of the Union Army.
In December 1861, James A. Alewine was sent to Warren Springs Hospital by order of the surgeon. His records show him back with his reconstituted unit, Company E, 4th Battalion, South Carolina Volunteers in the spring of 1862. In July 1862, it is noted that he had not been paid since October.
In the summer of 1862, J. A. Alewine is now assigned to his redesignated unit, Company I, Hampton Legion. He left the unit on August 14, 1862 and was carried on their rolls as a deserter until at least January 1863. He probably went back home having heard that is father was ill or dead. Interestingly, James and Sallie Alewine say they were married during this absence in 1862. (See 1900 US Census)
But, by September 1864, he is again present for duty and served until he was paroled at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. He made his way home and he and Sally started their family 9 months later with the birth of their first child, James W. Alewine in January 1866.
Contact Name:  Bill Alewine
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/4/2010
Company I
William John Jones - 1st Lieutenant   
Previously in Co. C, 4th SC.
Wounded in thigh at Deep Bottom.
Contact Name:  Keith Jones
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  www.csanewspapers.com
Date Added:  8/15/2007
Company K
Jacob Elias Corder - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  cris corder
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/16/2007
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