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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
197th Ohio Infantry      
Company C
Alfred Galen Anderson - Other   
Alfred Galen Anderson was a Hospital Steward and served with his Father Hugh P. Anderson, Surgeon.

Enlisted in Company C, Ohio 64th Infantry Regiment on 04 Oct 1861. Promoted to Full Hospital Steward on 13 Mar 1863. Mustered out on 03 Dec 1865 at Victoria, TX.
Contact Name:  Ellen Driscoll
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSmid=47437879&GRid=57703532&
Date Added:  8/4/2013
Company C
Hugh P Anderson - Surgeon   
Hugh P. Anderson was a surgeon in the Civil War and served with his son during the Sherman's Brigade. He was injured by falling off of a horse, and suffered for about 5 years before his death in 1869.

Promoted to Full Captain on 21 Oct 1861. Commissioned an officer in Company C, Ohio 64th Infantry Regiment on 03 Oct 1861. Promoted to Full Asst Surgeon on 27 Nov 1861. Promoted to Full Surgeon on 25 Feb 1864.Mustered out on 03 Dec 1865 at Victoria, TX.
Contact Name:  Ellen Driscoll
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Contact Homepage:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=26314631
Date Added:  8/4/2013
Company C
Issac Hunter Fulton - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Cynthia Anne Burgner
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/7/2012
Company C
William J Greer - Unknown   
'Billy ran away at the age of 16 and volunteered for Civil War Duty. James Greer's will grants $400 for a monument to honor him on his gravesite at Maplewood Cemetery in Emporia. He died 6-2 1862 near Corinth, Mississippi, a member of the 64th Regiment, Ohio Volunteers.' written by my grandmother, Caroline Virginia Greer Woodard in 1970.

I went looking for his grave in the Mississippi cemetery where they buried the dead from the Battle of Cornith. It was during this research that I discovered that he had died of typhus not from injuries sustained in the war. I wonder if anyone knew this about him. Did they just tell his family that he died? I don't think that anyone knew that he survived the battle only to get sick and die. In his regiment alone 274 people in Cornith and 160 of those were to disease.
Contact Name:  Darleen Totten
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  8/8/2013
Company D
Jacob Baugh - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Georgia Clyde
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  9/4/2011
Company G
Joseph F Gilbert - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Bret Gossard
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  3/12/2005
Company G
James A. Thompson - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  George Luedke
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  7/31/2005
Company H
Samuel B Libey - 1st Sergeant   
Samuel B. Libey was born in the year 1840 in Richland county Ohio, he later moved west with his family to Williams county. As a young man he returned again on his own to Richland county.

At the age of 21 Sam formally entered the Army as a private on April 18, 1861 and was mustered into Company D, 15th Ohio Infantry Regiment on April 27, 1861 for three months service.

Colonel George W. Andrews, Lt. Colonel Moses R. Dickey, and Major Silas B. Walker commanded the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry. The 15th was among the first to respond to president Lincoln's proclamation calling for 75,000 troops for a term of three months service by May 4, 1861. The companies composing the 15th were enrolled at the following places: Co. A, April 17, at Zanesville; B, April 18, Martinsville; C, April 23, and G and I, April 20, at Upper Sandusky; D, April 18, at Shelby; E, April 18, at VanWert; F, April 17, at Sidney; H, April 23, at Mansfield, and K, April 22, at Wapakoneta.

Three Months Service of the 15th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

The 15th was sent for initial duty on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad with operations in the vicinity of Philippi, Laurel Hill and Carrick's Ford June 3-July 16, 1861. Later the regiment saw action at Bowman's Place June 29,1861. With it's 3 months service up the volunteers were ordered back to Columbus and mustered out August 27–31, 1861. Sam and the rest of Company D, 15th Ohio Infantry Regiment mustered out on August 29, 1861.

http://www.ohiocivilwar.com/cw15.html

Two months later and still 21, Sam Libey re-enlisted again as a private in the Army on October 11, 1861 for three years service and was mustered into Company H, Sixty-Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI). On December 4, 1861 he was appointed to the rank of corporal.

Samuel B. Libey. Enlisted Oct 11 1861, Company H Richland County. Age 21. Rank: 1st Sgt
Appointed Corporal Dec 4 1861.
1st Sgt -- Missing in action Nov 30 1864 in battle of Franklin TN.
No further record found.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohscogs/Veterans/CivilWar.html


Company H of the 64th OVI mustered from the Richland County Ohio Area.

http://www.ohiocivilwar.com/cw64.html


“First Sergeant Libey of Company H, was a non-veteran, and was also a fine specimen, mentally and physically, of the best type of our volunteer soldiers.”

From first hand account: The Battle of Franklin

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31468/31468-h/31468-h.htm

http://www30.us.archive.org/stream/thebattleoffrank31468gut/pg31468.txt


64th Ohio Infantry

SERVICE.—

Duty at Danville and Bali's Gap, Ky., January and February, 1862.
March to Munfordsville, thence to Nashville, Tenn., February 7-March 13, and to Savannah, Tenn., March 29-April 6.
BATTLE OF SHILOH, TENN. APRIL 6-7.
Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30.
Pursuit to Booneville June 1-12.
Duty along Memphis & Charleston Railroad till August.
March to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg, August 21-September 26.
Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-15.
Bardstown, Ky., October 3.
BATTLE OF PERRYVILLE OCTOBER 8.
March to Nashville, Tenn., October 16-November 7, and duty there till December 26.
Advance on Murfreesboro December 26-30.
Nolensville December 27.
BATTLE OF STONE'S RIVER DECEMBER 30-31 1862, AND JANUARY 1-3, 1863.
Duty at Murfreesboro till June.
Reconnaissance to Nolensville and Versailles January 13-15.
Middle Tennessee (or Tullahoma) Campaign June 23-July 7.
Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16.
Passage of the Cumberland Mountains and Tennessee River, and Chickamauga (Ga.)
Campaign August 16-September 22.
Reconnaissance toward Chattanooga September 7.
Lookout Valley September 7-8.
Occupation of Chattanooga September 9.
Lee and Gordon's Mills September 11-13.
Near Lafayette September 14.
BATTLE OF CHICKAMUGA SEPTEMBER 19-20.
Siege of Chattanooga, Tenn., September 24-November 23.
Pursuit to Graysville September 26-27.
Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27.
Orchard Knob November 23-24.
Mission Ridge November 25.
March to relief of Knoxville, Tenn., November 28-December 8.
Operations in East Tennessee till April, 1864.
Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-September 8.
Demonstrations on Rocky Face Ridge and Dalton May 8-13.
Buzzard's Roost Gap or Mill Springs May 8-9.
Battle of Resaca May 14-15.
Near Calhoun May 16.
Adairsville May 17.
Near Kingston May 18-19.
Near Cassville May 19.
Advance on Dallas May 22-25.
OPERATIONS ON LINE OF PUMPKIN VINE CREEK AND BATTLES ABOUT DALLAS, NEW HOPE CHURCH, AND ALLATOONA HILLS MAY 25-JUNE 5.
Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2.
Pine Hill June 11-14.
Lost Mountain June 15-17.
Assault on Kenesaw June 27.
Ruff's Station or Smyrna Camp Ground July 4.
Chattahoochie River July 5-17.
Buckhead, Nancy's Creek, July 18.
Peach Tree Creek July 19-20.
Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25.
Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30.
BATTLE OF JONESBORO AUGUST 31-SEPTEMBER 1.
Lovejoy Station September 2-6.
Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama against Hood September 29-November 3.
Nashville Campaign November-December.
Near Edenton November 21.
Columbia, Duck River, November 24-27.
Spring Hill November 29.
BATTLE OF FRANKLIN NOVEMBER 30.
BATTLE OF NASHVILLE DECEMBER 15-16.
Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28.
Moved to Huntsville, Ala., and duty there till March, 1865.
Operations in East Tennessee March 15-April 22.
At Nashville, Tenn., till June.
Moved to New Orleans, La., June 16, thence to Texas, and duty there till December.
Mustered out December 3, 1865.

Source Information:
From Dyer's Compendium

http://www.ohiocivilwar.com/cw64.html


The Regiment lost during service 6 officers and 108 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 159 enlisted men killed by disease, for a total of 274.

http://www.ohiocivilwar.com/cw64.html

Although Samuel B. Libey is officially listed by army records as missing in action in the battle of Franklin Tennessee an eyewitness account of the battle described him as being killed while retreating from a forward position outside the city towards the inside of the fortified breastworks surrounding the town proper. While the battle was convincingly won by the Federals a withdrawal across the Harpeth river during the night surrendered the field to the Confederate Army.

From pictures of the battlefield and testimony collected just after the battle it is probable Sam and the rest of the Federal dead were buried en-mass in the breastwork trench surrounding the town. The confederate dead at Franklin can be seen in the pictures of the field as being buried where they fell with each grave marked by a wooden cross. Within a year of the battle the townsfolk of Franklin had burned a great amount of the the wooden crosses as firewood. In the spring of 1866 the McGavock Family of Franklin donated 2 acres near their home, Carnton, to establish a Confederate Cemetery where 1,481 soldiers are laid to rest. Soldier remains from the battle were subsequently found from time to time in the field for years after the war with the latest just recently being found inside the city.
Contact Name:  Douglas J Libey
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/5/2008
Company I
John W. Horn - Sergeant   
John Horn was born October 3, 1842, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, and moved to Stark county in 1857. On October 29, 1861, at the age of 19 years, he enlisted in Company I, of the old 64th O.V.I., and served faithfully until the close of the war, and was mustered out December 3, 1865, having served four years and two months. His service was in
the western army. He was at Shiloh, Stone River, and Chickamanga, at which last place he was
desperately wounded in the head, from which he recovered sufficiently to return to duty about January 1, 1864.
Contact Name:  Mike Horn
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  9/1/2008
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