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Civil War Genealogy Database
All Units - Artillery - Cavalry - Engineers - Infantry - Marines - Medical - Misc - Naval
34th Indiana Infantry      
Company A
George W. Harter - Lieutenant   
"GEORGE HARTER, farmer, was born in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, January 9, 1835, son of Michael and Mary (Slone) Harter, the former a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and who immigrated to America in 1828. He was married in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, which was the home of Mary Slone. Six children were born to this union--Ann, George, Margaret, Sarah, Andrew and Thomas Slone. The family settled in Jefferson Township, Wells County, Indiana, in October, 1852, locating on the farm now owned by John B. Ady. The parents lived upon this farm several years, and in 1876 removed to Ossian, living a retired life. Both reached a ripe old age, the father being eighty-two and the mother eighty-four. Their deaths occurred within a few months of each other. They had reared a family who were a credit to their ancestry, had a comfortable home and an ample income for their declining years. Both were zealous members of the Presbyterian church and were retiring in disposition, though firm in principle.

Their sons were imbued with patriotism inherited from their Revolutionary sires on the mother's side, and all enlisted during the progress of the late war. Our subject enlisted August 31, 1861, as a private in Company A, Thirty-fourth Indiana Infantry. March 1, 1862, he was promoted to Second Lieutenant, and one year later to First Lieutenant of his company. His regiment was engaged at the siege of New Madrid, battle of Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi, and many skirmishes. At the battle of Champion Hills Mr. Harter acted as aid to General McGinnis, and carried to General Grant the dispatch from General Hovey asking for reinforcements. This incident is alluded to by General Grant in his Memoirs (vol. 1, page 517). July 19, 1864, Lieutenant Harter was discharged from the service for disability.

Andrew and Thomas shared the fate of thousands of brave men who fell on the battlefield. Andrew belonged to Company K, Seventy-fifth Indiana Infantry, and was shot dead September 19, 1863, while in line of duty at Chickamauga. Thomas, although a sickly lad, after his brotherÂ’s death insisted on taking his place. Although urged by his friends to stay at home, on account of feeble health, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Indiana Infantry, for 100 days. He was unable to withstand the Southern climate, and died a few days before his term of service expired, at Tullahoma, Tennessee.

Our subject returned home, and in August, 1864, married Miss Martha, daughter of James and Rachel (Allen) Glass, of Jefferson Township. They commenced living on the farm, and Mr. Harter has followed that vocation ever since. He has also been an extensive breeder of stock. Previous to the war he was a teacher, and taught seven consecutive winters in this county. Dr. A. G. Gorrell and J. J. Todd, of Bluffton, Dr. C. V. Torrell, of New Haven, Hon. Joseph Ady, of Kansas, J. W. Wilson, of Fort Wayne, Dr. Frederick Glock, deceased, late of Adams County, Revs. Sherman McCorkle and Charles O. Robb, and other noted men of this and other counties were his pupils. He is a member of William Swaim Post, No. 169, G. A. R., and was a delegate from the Eleventh District to the Grand Encampment held at San Francisco August 3, 1886. For sixteen years Mr. Harter has served as one of the ruling elders of the Ossian Presbyterian Church, and teacher for a number of years of the adult Bible class.

Mr. and Mrs. Harter have had six children, only two surviving—-Mollie and Webner. The daughter is completing her musical education, and is quite an accomplished scholar. Mr. Harter is a self-made man in every respect, having commenced at the age of nineteen for himself as a farm laborer at 50 cents per day, and now, as a result of honest industry and wise economy, is in possession of a competence for present wants and future necessities." {Biographical sketch extracted from book titled " {Biographical and historical record of Adams and Wells counties, Indiana", Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1887. p. 679-680.}

Born in Beaver County, Pennsylvania on January 9th, 1835, George grew up under the guidance and principles of his parents, Michael and Mary (Sloane) Harter. He accompanied his parents when they migrated to Wells County, Indiana in October 1852 where they hoped cheaper land could be gained and their children could prosper. Once there, they settled on a farm and began to to realize their dreams.

George, raised in the Christian environment established by his parents, shared their views and was considered firm on principles. He received a sound education growing up both at home and academically. While in Ossian, he taught for seven years in the schools of Wells County.

As the United States inched toward civil war that threatened to rip it apart, the patriotism inspired by his parents rose. Like Michael and Mary, George was kind in heart and charitable by nature but fiercely loyal to the country his father now claimed as his own.

George enlisted on August 31, 1861 early during the American Civil War as a Private in Company A (The Morton Rifles), 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment. The regiment was organized at Anderson, Indiana from September 21 to October 10, 1861, to serve three years (or until the end of the war). He was described as 26 years of age with black eyes and hair, dark complexion and five feet, seven and one half inches tall. Assigned to the Department of the Gulf and after less than one years Service, he was promoted (22 February, 1862) to the rank of Second Lieutenant. Within the next year (1 March 1863), he obtained the grade of First Lieutenant of his company.

He was constantly with his regiment, taking part in General Grant's campaigns in forcing open the Mississippi River for the Union. That he saw active combat is not doubted as "as one could not be with Grant and not fight." Island No. 10, New Madrid, Champion's Hill, Riddle's Point, the Seige of Vicksburg, Fort Pillow, Grand Prairie, Carrion Crow, Yazoo Pass, Grand Chateau, Port Gibson, Black River Bridge, Jackson . . . the list of battles rolls on.

It was during the Battle of Champions Hill (May 16, 1863) at Edwards, Mississippi, Lt. Harter was acting as the aide to General McGinnis. McGinnis sent Lt. Harter carrying a dispatch from General Hovey to General U.S. Grant asking for reinforcements. The incident was considered critical to the Union victory there with Grant himself alluding to it in his memoirs (Volume I, page 517).

But the rigors of active campaigning and Army life itself had taken it's toll on his health. It eventually degenerated so badly, he was virtually incapacitated from sickness. Lieutenant George Harter was discharged on July 19, 1864 due to those disabilities inflicted by three years of war.

George Harter returned to Ossian, Wells County, Indiana where he wed Martha Glass, the daughter of James and Rachel Glass, on August 25th, 1864. They settled on the same local farm as his parents and raised a family until his retirement. Six children were born to George and Martha--Florence R., Thomas S., Charles C., John T.G., Mary Frances and Webner N. Unfortunately, only two--Mary Frances and Webner-- survived to adulthood.

Politically, it is safe to say George Harter's sentiments fell with the Republicans. In 1888, during the Indiana State Republican Coventon, George was nominated for a seat in Congress. Personally having little interest in the job, he did little so far as active campaigning. Despite this though, he was only narrowly defeated by a few votes.

He was a active member of the William Swaim Post No. 169 of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), and was selected as a delegate from the Eleventh District of the GAR to the 1886 Grand Encampment held in San Francisco, California. He was also a active member of the Presbyterian Church of Ossian as are all his family. While a member, he served for more than twenty years as a Ruling Elder and as a teacher in the adult bible class.

His beloved Mary passed away on March 26, 1903 in Ossian. George lived on to a ripe age dying on August 22, 1910. He finally succumbed to an illness that had plagued him the last years of his life. His physical debilitations had been accompanied by some mental aberrations requiring him to be kept under constant watch. For the final three to four weeks of his life, this restricted him to his bed with his daughter Mary bearing the bulk of the duty. He was laid to rest on Wednesday, the 24th of August alongside his wife, Mary, and four children in the Oak Lawn Cemetery in Ossian.
Contact Name:  Richard Lewis Blanton Jr.
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Date Added:  2/21/2022
Company A
James Abraham Milliken - Corporal   
James Abraham Milliken was the third child and first son of Samuel & Sarah (Robison) Milliken. Born on December 13, 1835 in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, he accompanied his parents and two other siblings on their journey west and there relatively short stay in Mahoning and Trumbull Counties, Ohio. The Millikens, now with five more children, eventually settled in Wells County, Indiana sometime around 1840.

Through the 1850s and as the 1860 Presidential elections neared, the dark clouds of conflict gathered over the young United States. Upon Abraham Lincoln's election and the secession of the Southern slaveholding states, the clouds broke and engulfed the nation in the worst kind of warfare imaginable--Brother killing Brother--CIVIL WAR!!

James Abraham Milliken enlisted on August 26th, 1861 in Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana. Enrolled in the 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry at Andrews, Indiana on 21 September 1861 by Captain Swaim, he was mustered in on October 4th 1861 in Anderson, Indiana by Lt. Colonel Wood at the age of 25 years. He was described in his service records as having grey eyes, sandy hair, standing 5 feet 6 1/2 inches in height with a dark complexion.

He served first in Company A, 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment. On 20 August, 1862, he was detached as Corporal in the Pioneer Corps. In the November/December 1862 muster rolls he was listed as absent from his unit being ill in Saint Louis, Missouri. By January 1863, he had rejoined his regiment in time to participate with General Grant's bold stroke to circumvent and eventually envelope the city of Vicksburg in the spring of 1863.

n the 10th of April, 1863, the regiment was assigned to the 1st Brigade, General McGinnis commanding of Hovey's 12th Division of the 13th Army Corps, and remained in this command during the campaign and seige of Vicksburg.

On the 10th of April it was started on the Vicksburg campaign from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, to a point on the west side of the Mississippi River and crossed the river on transports and gunboats to Bruinsburg, on the east side of the river, on the 30th of April, marched all night and engaged the enemy at daylight on the 1st of May, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regiment by command of General Hovey, supported by the 56th Ohio, charged a Confederate battery during the battle, early in the morning, and captured the two field pieces of artillery and 49 prisoners. In this battle the regiment lost 49, killed and wounded.

On the 16th of May the regiment engaged in the battle of Champion's Hill, and, while advancing in line of battle, captured the 46th Alabama Confederate Regiment, with its colors, all field officers and 127 men. In this battle the 34th suffered heavy losses in killed and wounded, and among the latter was Lieutenant-Colonel Swaim, who died of his wounds on the 17th of June, 1863 and James Abraham Milliken.

James was listed as wounded at Champions Hill (Thompsons Mill), Mississippi on 16 May 1863 suffering a serious wound in his face. Medical records submitted as part of the pension filed indicate that "a conical ball {most likely a 'Minnie Ball'} struck the end of nose immediately above its point, passing upwards backwards and to the left, and was cut out from the angle of the lower jaw, left--side. It has scarred and turned the nose somewhat to the left , and nearly closed the left nasal orifice, impairing respiration and the sense of smell and also impaired mastication on the left side. The nerves distributed to the left arm seem also to be somewhat affected."

Moving forward with the army, the 34th, with McGinnis' Brigade took position in front of the Confederate defenses at Vicksburg, opposite Confederate Fort Garrot, and participated in the siege until the final surrender July 4, 1863, suffering 13 men killed and wounded during the siege. During this time, James was left behind at a field hospital on the Champions Hill battlefield.

While recuperating in the field hospital on Champions Hill, it was captured by the Confederates. He was paroled by the Southern forces on June 6th and he was returned to Indianapolis, Indiana where he was formally paroled on 25 June 1863. Muster rolls for November/December 1863 list him as 'Absent without Leave'. No indications that any charges were brought against him. In fact, he was "discharged from the 34th Indiana on January 28th, 1864 to receive (a) commission by order (of) the Secy of war Special Order No. 147 War Dept Adjt Gen'l Office, Washington April 14, 1864".

He was shown in his records as re-enlisting with the 130th Indiana on the 14th of January by the Indiana Governor Morton.
Contact Name:  Richard Lewis Blanton Jr.
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Date Added:  2/21/2022
Company A
William Milliken - Corporal   
William Milliken was born in Mahoning County, Ohio on October 13, 1837. He followed his parents, Samuel and Sarah (Robison) Milliken went they moved to the Wells County area on Indiana.

William, as did several of his brothers, answered his country's call to arms during the Civil War. At 23 years of age, he enlisted at Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana on August 22nd, 1861. He was first reflected on Company A (Captain Swaim's company), 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment muster-in rolls on October 18th, 1861 as having actually mustered in as a Private on October 4th at Anderson, Indiana.

At the age of 25, he was "discharged by virtue of re-enlistment as a a Veteran Volunteer under General Order 191 Series 1963 on December 14th, 1863 at New Iberia, Louisiana for a 3-year term of service. He was mustered in as a 'Veteran' on February 17th, 1864 at Pass Cavallo, Texas with Company A, 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment ("Morton Rifles").

William was eventually promoted via regimental orders to Corporal around September 21st, 1864. He once again re-enlisted and remained with the 34th until he was mustered out at War's end at Brownsville, Texas on February 3rd, 1866.
Contact Name:  Richard Lewis Blanton Jr.
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Date Added:  2/21/2022
Company A
Soloman B. Nelson - Unknown   
Grandfather of my Great grandfather's father.
Contact Name:  Bill Ramp
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Date Added:  8/20/2010
Company B
Thos. Grimes - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company B
Anthony Washington Slay - Corporal   
My 3rd great grandfather; served from 1861 to 1866; was held as a POW in Texas. Married to Mary Farrington was the son of Edward Slay and Lydia Gray.
Contact Name:  L Craig Slay
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  6/2/2011
Company B
John J. Williams - Private   
May 13, 1865 - Last land action of the Civil war was at Palmito Ranch, Texas. Private John J. Williams, age 22, was the last fatality during the battle, making him the final combat death of the war. He was in Co. B, 34th Indiana Infantry Regiment. Burial was at Alexandria National Cemetery, in Louisiana.

Williams was born in Jay County, Indiana, and joined the Union Army September 1863, probably in Anderson. He moved to Camp Joe Holt where his unit drilled before being put on duty in the field. His regiment spent most of the war on guard and garrison duty in the Western Theater, including New Orleans where he was stationed before his unit joined the army forming for the invasion and occupation of Texas in the spring of 1865.
Contact Name:  Eric Cunningham
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Date Added:  5/13/2015
Company C
William Woorster - Unknown   
William was part of the Mortan rifles group for 3 years during the Civil War.
Contact Name:  Keith Stroud
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Date Added:  6/11/2010
Company D
Samuel Hartle - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Jesse Hartle
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Date Added:  4/18/2018
Company D
Ezekiel Manring - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Julian Wall
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Date Added:  5/31/2010
Company D
Amos S Slane - Unknown   
From Wells Co. Biography -'In October, 1862, Mr. Slane responded, to the country’s call for volunteers by enlisting in Company D, Thirty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and he received his first baptism of fire at Yazon Pass, Mississippi, where he was wounded by musket ball just below the right knee. The serious nature of this wound necessitated his retention for six weeks in the hospital, but as soon as sufficiently recovered he rejoined his command and was soon thereafter engaged in the battles of Port Gibson, Champaign Hills, Black River Bridge and later took part in the operations around Vicksburg. Soon after the fall of that city he was detailed for hospital guard, and later did guard duty for a period of six months at New Orleans. His military career ended in October, 1865, receiving his discharge at Brownsville, Texas, and returning home immediately thereafter engaged in farm labor by the month continuing thus until the latter part of 1866.'
I have his court martial papers - he refused to come to muster with arms and was court-martialed in Apr 1865.
Contact Name:  Sandy Altman
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Date Added:  7/10/2008
Company D
Levi Thompson - Corporal   
Found his records on ancestry.com. Born in Pennsylvania 1835/6. Mustered out as Corporal.
Contact Name:  Mike Thompson
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Date Added:  9/18/2010
Company E
William Richwine - Private   
If any has pictures,letters or other documents,I would gladly pay for copies. Thanks SGT Ralph W Richwine
Contact Name:  Ralph W Richwine
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Date Added:  3/18/2009
Company E
Joseph Waymire - Corporal   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Mark Decker
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Date Added:  6/15/2010
Company F
Charles F Hedrick - Private   
Enlisted as a Private on 14 August 1863.
Enlisted in Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 14 Aug 1863.
Received a disability discharge from Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 13 Nov 1865.
Contact Name:  Kenneth Hedrick
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Date Added:  12/6/2007
Company F
Benjamin Franklin Hix - Private   
Hix, Benjamin; Priv., Co F, 34th Reg.; mustered in September 16, 1861 Muster Out Febuary 3,1866. Served two tours.
b.6-13-41, d. 7-12-89 Buried Fairview/Hix/Bradford Cem., Grant Co., IN
Contact Name:  Jay Brown
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Date Added:  5/6/2010
Company F
Oliver P Hix - Private   
Hix, Oliver P.; Priv., Co F, 34th Reg.; MO 9-21-64. Buried Salem Cem., Grant Co., IN
Contact Name:  Jay Brown
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Date Added:  5/6/2010
Company F
John C Macy - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Fred Rose
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Date Added:  12/19/2005
Company F
James Linus Marshall - Private   
No Comments

Contact Name:  JoDee Marshall
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Date Added:  4/6/2010
Company F
Isaiah Thomas - Private   
Enlisted as a Private on 28 February 1864
Enlisted in Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 28 February 1864.
Mustered out Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 03 February 1866.
Contact Name:  Fred Rose
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Date Added:  12/19/2005
Company F
Lewis Turner - Private   
Enlisted as a Private on 25 September 1861.
Enlisted in Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 25 Sep 1861.
Received a disability discharge from Company F, 34th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 10 Jun 1864.
Contact Name:  Fred Rose
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Date Added:  7/28/2009
Company Field & Staff
William Achsah Swaim - Lt. Colonel   
Lieutenant Colonel of 34th Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Was mortally wounded in the Battle of Champion Hill east of Vicksburg, Mississippi on May 16th, 1863. Died of wounds on June 16th, 1863.
Contact Name:  Richard Lewis Blanton
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/8/2015
Company G
James Abraham Milliken - Corporal   
Wounded at Battle of Champion Hill, Mississippi. Mustered out and mustered into 130th Indiana.
Contact Name:  Richard Lewis Blanton, Jr.
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  2/2/2010
Company H
Thomas B. Pitzer - Private   
When cleaning out my parents'' home after their death, I found the civil war discharge papers of Thomas B. Pitzer, who was enrolled on 21 Sept 1861 in the 34th Indiana as a private and served 3 years in it before his discharge at the same rank in Indianapolis 21 Sept 1864. He was in Capt. W. W. Stephenson''s Company H. He was born in Fayette County, Ohio, and moved with his family to Indiana as a child. He was 20 at the time of his discharge. He went on to teach school and to marry, but his wife and only child predeceased him, dying of was was then called ''galloping consumption'' (TB, probably) about ten years after his discharge. He was older the brother of my great great grandmother, Mariel Ann Pitzer Carr.
Contact Name:  Anne Goldstein
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Date Added:  5/29/2004
Company I
Alden L Feltt - Unknown   
war, died in Hospital in Louisville, KY of wound
Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
William Foreman - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Evan Hemminger - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Moses Hemminger - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Thomas Jarrett - Unknown   
killed in the battle of Champion Hills, Miss.
Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Thomas J. Markin - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
George W Mott - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Jonas Milton Penrod - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
John A Pugh - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
John D. Tweedy - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Josiah Twibell - Captain   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
William Twibell - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
William Walker - Corporal   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
Harvey Webster - 2nd Lieutenant   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
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Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
James A. West - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/15/2005
Company I
John H. Wood - Unknown   
No Comments

Contact Name:  Historic Woodlawn Cemetery research
Contact Email:  Click for E-mail
Date Added:  10/15/2005
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