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 (1939-1945) WWII
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Brian W
Atlanta GA USA
Posts: 1083
Joined: 2004
Poland: The first recipient of Blitzkreig
1/27/2021 7:55:57 PM
I'm currently reading "Poland & The Second World War 1938-48" (Pen and Sword Military (September 28, 2019).
I'm about a 1/3 of the way through the book and to the point of where Dunkirk and the collapse of France is happening (thus, the Dunkirk thread).
The author makes a great point that if the England/France had studied the effects of the German assault on Poland in-depth, they would've been better prepared. Instead, they dismissed the total collapse of Poland due to incompetence/insufficiencies of the Polish military and determined it couldn't possibly happen to them. Most importantly the effects of the grouping of armor.

Anyway, I found it fascinating since England/France had months to study what happened (and I'm sure they did to an extent), but was still caught off-guard.
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"Take it easy. But take it" - Tom Morello's mom.
Brian Grafton
Victoria BC Canada
Posts: 3882
Joined: 2004
Poland: The first recipient of Blitzkreig
1/27/2021 11:07:51 PM
Brian, Pen and Sword are bringing out some interesting volumes. Remember John Barrett? His books were published through Pen and Sword.

This one sound interesting; I’m gonna have to look for it. I’d like to follow the author’s argument in detail before I say too much, but I’ve always sensed that Britain and France remained prepared to refight WW1. This is always a danger: victors buld on their victories. Within the last week, e.g., I heard someone suggesting that the US Army is fully prepared to fight in the Fulda Gap, but nowhere else.

I think there were a host of other issues beyond British/French assessments of Polish competence that affected preparation for a potential German assault. They ran from misreading of German morale to challenges concerning Benelux neutrality to misreading Panzer capability to rather outdated beliefs in static defensive structures. They included the larger question of whether the war would continue after the fall of Poland. The “Phony war” or “Sitzkrieg” was a six-month reality, as no enemy did much at all to anybody.

Got an author for Poland and The Second World War: 1938-48? Think I should consider ordering it, in hopes of being able to read it soon.

Cheers. And stay safe.
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.
Brian W
Atlanta GA USA
Posts: 1083
Joined: 2004
Poland: The first recipient of Blitzkreig
1/27/2021 11:22:10 PM
Yes, it's written by Evan McGilvray. [Read More]

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"Take it easy. But take it" - Tom Morello's mom.
Phil Andrade
London  UK
Posts: 5186
Joined: 2004
Poland: The first recipient of Blitzkreig
1/31/2021 5:58:34 AM
If memory serves me, there were one or two episodes in the Polish Campaign in which the Germans suffered local but significant reverses. It didn’t all run so smoothly as popular perception has depicted. There was even some evidence of a collapse of morale in one or two German units. The Germans were quick to study the cases and were determined to apply the lessons. This is vague on my part, so I’ll try and substantiate with detail .


Regards, Phil
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"Egad, sir, I do not know whether you will die on the gallows or of the pox!" "That will depend, my Lord, on whether I embrace your principles or your mistress." Earl of Sandwich and John Wilkes
Brian Grafton
Victoria BC Canada
Posts: 3882
Joined: 2004
Poland: The first recipient of Blitzkreig
2/4/2021 7:13:49 PM
Phil, something along those lines was raised by John R. Price in my “World War II: Day by day” thread some 3 years ago. Is that what you’re remembering. IIRC, John R. raised specific examples of Polish resistance which hit German troops somewhat severely. Not organized resistance, IIRC, but punishing and perhaps even Polish Army-based rear-guard action.

As a discussion of German blitzkrieg, I’ve tended to rely on Len Deighton’s Blitzkrieg, a new “ancient” volume published in 1979 or so, as my foundation argument. Linked with his companion volume, Fighter, (Battle of Britain) and his novel, Bomber, I think he still offers pretty sound discussion in prose that is never unclear.

Cheers. And stay safe.
Brian G
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"We have met the enemy, and he is us." Walt Kelly. "The Best Things in Life Aren't Things" Bumper sticker.

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